McGinty Mountain

Peak Name: McGinty Mountain
Distance: 4.77 miles
Date: June 30, 2019
Summit: 2,156 feet

Since I had hiked both the Kanaka Flats Loop and Arrowmaker Ridge High Point the day before, I was looking for something a bit shorter. McGinty Mountain fit that requirements nicely. I convinced Dave to tag along for the hike. Drove out to Jamul, and pulled into the parking lot which was filled with about a half dozen cars. We grabbed our gear and head out onto the trail.

We began quickly climbing toward the false summit, passing three hikers who were training for an upcoming Sierra backup trip.

Soon the summit came into view and we continued our climb. I pointed out the abandoned mine across the divide.

Upon reaching the summit we meet two other hikers.

Unfortunately, flying termites were swarming about, so we grabbed a few photos and quickly headed back down.

The hike back to the car went quickly. Since we did it slightly faster than planned, it was too early for lunch, so a refreshing Jamba Juice filled in. This was peak #44 of the 100 Peak Challenge Reboot. Now to plan the hikes for the July 4th weekend…

Sycuan Peak

Peak Name: Sycuan Peak
Distance: 2.15 miles
Date: June 22, 2019
Summit: 2,793 feet

I needed to do a short test hike to see if my back was up to the challenge of attempting Mt. Baldy the next day. Sycuan Peak again fit the bill perfectly, close by, short but enough of challenge.

As I pulled off the road near the trailhead, there was another car parked there. I headed up the old road toward the summit. The rains had made the ruts a little deeper and it was more overgrown as well.

The overcast skies made for a pleasant ascent. As I worked my way up, I wondered when I might encounter those other hikers. Just before the summit, I met the first of the two ladies who had decided to summit it as well. I asked how they picked this hike and they said they read about it in Afoot and Afield in San Diego. At the summit, I found the benchmark but no sign of any register. We chatted a bit, mostly me recommending various other peaks to try.

They headed back down, and I poked around to see if I might see the register. The sun started to burn through the marine layer, I headed down as well. I would hear the telltale sound of a rattle off in the bushes, but nothing on the trail. I caught the ladies again and continued on.

The back held up fine and I am ready to tackle Mt. Baldy! This peak was #42 of my 100 Peak Challenge Reboot!

McGinty Mountain

Peak Name: McGinty Mountain
Distance: 4.77 miles
Date: December 24, 2017
Summit: 2,156 feet

Located near Jamul, stands McGinty Mountain. Jerry Schad, the original author of Afoot and Afield in San Diego, wrote

While there is not as much foot traffic on this trail as nearby Mount Woodson, Iron Mountain, and Cowles Mountain, the views at the summit are equally as stunning and worth taking in.

A nice sized dirt parking lot is available next to the trailhead. A kiosk provides some information about the trail and the area. I was joined by my friend Michael and his son Jacob.

The trail follows the side of the mountain, using a series of long switchbacks. You gain some elevation quickly, so make sure you stretch first. After a bit, the grade will lessen, keep an eye on your route as the area is riddled with side trails. Usually, the heavier trafficked path is the correct one.

About 2.2 miles in, the grade will increase again, but as a reward, you will see one of the old mines off in the distance. It is easy to miss but the picture below shows where to stop to see it.

Soon, you will reach the summit of McGinty Mountain after a little rock scrambling.

Once you reach the summit, you will be rewarded with views of Mount Helix and Cowles Mountain to your west and San Miguel Mountain and Tecate Peak to the east.

Sycuan Peak

Peak Name: Sycuan Peak
Distance: 2.15 miles
Date: November 12, 2017
Summit: 2,793 feet

After three peaks the day before, I opted to just grab a shorter peak on Sunday. Sycuan Peak fits that bill perfectly. Ted and I made the drive out to the trailhead. I was thankful to have some extra eyes, as there wasn’t much parking on the road and the trailhead was easy to miss. Once we began up the trail, we did see the sign for the ecological preserve.

The trail immediately started climbing steeply. Portions of the trail were quite rutted as well continued our ascent, but soon we found ourselves scrambling over the rocks to reach the summit.

I don’t think there was a register, but we did find the benchmark. After a short rest, we headed back down to the car.