Rae Lakes

As my permit dates for Rae Lakes began approaching, I started watching the weather forecasts with more interest. Initially, this was to figure out what I might need to pack. But as the days became closer and closer, I became more concerned about the conditions I might find myself in. This was going to be my first multi-day solo trip, so I was trending toward being extra cautious about the journey. Initially, the forecast called for a warm start, followed by a 20% chance of thunderstorms for the rest of the trip. That is manageable, as thunderstorms are common in the latter part of the day. But each day, the forecast kept trending in the wrong direction. That 20-30% chance became 30-40%, then 40-50%. In addition, the weather service also issued a Fire Weather Warning (which was later changed to a Red Flag Warning) for late Monday afternoon through Tuesday evening. They warned of dry lightning triggering fires and the high winds creating the possibility of it becoming fast-moving. Not really the conditions that I looked forward to hiking into. As I sat in my hotel in Visalia, I reached out to some of my more experienced backpacking buddies (David & Leslie/Mike) to get their take. They all agreed that it did not look like it was going to be a fun trip. The general consensus was to go ahead, get up early as planned and drive the 2 hours to Road’s End and consult with the ranger. If I liked what I heard, continue on to the first campsite and spend the night. Then I could make the call and decide if I want to continue or simply turn back. With that, I set my alarm for 4 am, and hit the pillow.

When I woke up. I checked the latest weather report and saw that it was looking more like 50-60% of thunderstorms and showers as well were now in the forecast. Given I had not camped in the rain, doing it for multiple days seemed like a poor option. I got to the permit station just a touch after 7 am. I spoke with Ranger Mary about the forecast and what her thoughts were. She basically asked, “How much do you like being wet?” That settled it, no loop for me this time, but I was still game for one night in the wilderness! So, I parked in the long-term lot, finished getting ready, and hit the trailhead just before 8 am. The forecast for Upper Paradise was to be in the low 80s, with a light breeze. I had hoped that my early start would let me stay ahead of the heat. I had not paid attention to the forecasted high, so I had no idea exactly what I might be racing against.

The trail is fairly flat for the first 1.9 miles until it reaches the junction of the Kings River and Bubbs Creek. Here I would take the left fork and begin ascending toward Paradise Valley. The sounds of the river were so refreshing. The views were as incredible as I had imagined. It was getting warmer as I pushed on. I had a liter of water in my interior water bladder, a liter in a side bottle, and 1 liter of Gatorade. I could feel my pace slow. At first, I thought I might be the added weight of 5 days of food, the extra clothing, and other items making it tougher. But, as I felt the sweat begin to soak my shirt, I knew that day was warmer than I had hoped for. 

At Mist Falls I took an extended break. Ate some of the oranges I brought for the first day and drank some more fluids. I decided to spend a bit of time in the shade and recharge before pressing on. Most everyone here were day-hikers. Oh, how I coveted their small light packs… I pressed on, being mindful of the temperatures. I dug out my cooling towel and wrapped it around my neck. 

I kept finding myself looking for a place to sit under some shade for a bit. I checked my position and the topography ahead of me. I gave serious consideration to throwing in the towel and bailing. I found another rest stop and refilled my side bottle with some cool water from the river (properly filtered of course). I finished my oranges but still could not think about having my proper lunch. I knew that this was not a good sign, so I tore open one of my goos and forced it down. 

As I made my way across the exposed switchbacks, I estimated the temperatures were either in the upper 80s or low 90s. This was going to take some serious effort if I was actually going to make camp. My spirits were getting crushed. I would move from shady section to shady section, pausing for a bit almost every time. Once I reached the southern end of the valley, I took another break and was able to eat my lunch. I again went to the river to filter more water, as my bladder had been completely emptied by this point. Rechecking the map, I was not too far from Middle Paradise campsite, so I pressed on. 

Passing through Lower Paradise, I could see the numerous dead trees and why this campsite is currently closed. I then spied the bear locker at Middle Paradise and said this was as far as I was going to go. I was the only one here, so picked a nice spot a bit back from the water, hoping the bugs would not be an issue. Thankfully, for most of the hike, they were not too bad.

I got some more water and then began to set up camp for the night. It was only 3:30 or so, but I just did not have the energy to hike another 2 or so miles to Upper Paradise. Eventually, 3 other hikers joined me at the site. And not soon after that, a doe strolled past us with not a care in the world. While soaking my feet in the cool water, I used my InReach to report in with my wife and give her my status.

My site had a fire ring, so I had planned for a small fire to pass the time later. I gathered some starter material and placed the pine needles in the pit. I then set off to find some downed wood that I could use. I started to smell the familiar smell of a campfire. I figured it must be from further down the trail. According to GaiaGPS, the Middle Paradise campsite was further north. I then looked over to the fire pit, and the started material had begun to smolder on its own! It seems the last users of this firepit had not properly put it out. Thankfully, I took care of it, but I was pissed. 

About 4 to 6 other hikers passed on through, pushing on toward Upper Paradise. I would say now that I had an extended break here, I probably could have pushed on. But, I was fine spending the night here. Later in the early evening, two more hikers also decided to find a spot to pitch their tents. It was one of them who spotted the bear as it passed around us. We watched it as it took a look at us. It looked to be about 2-3 years old and did not seem to have any tags or collar. Eventually, it wandered away. I certainly was going to be a bit more cautious for the evening. Since I was not needing 5 days of food I treated myself to a double dinner, being a bit more mindful of any unwanted company. 

With plenty of water to manage my fire, I sat and enjoyed the flames. I reflected on what I had overcome. I let the fire die down until only the embers remained, I doused it with my water pouches and made sure it was out. I had really wanted to gaze up at the night sky from Rae Lakes, but this view would have to do. The night was pleasant, I slept without the cover on my tent and just my camp shirt on. Once the moon rose, it did wake me once, but even that was a welcomed sight. As the pre-dawn broke, I found myself rested and ready to head back out. The other folks were going to continue on to Woods Creek and then see what the weather held. I did briefly consider it, but in the end, felt it best to stick to the one night.

I repacked my bag, trying to be mindful of the other campers. I knew I was hiking down into the heat, so I wanted an earlier start. Not ten minutes on the trail, I spotted that same bear dashing in front of me and then stopping a safe distance away. I kept my face toward him as I continued carefully down the trail. Two hikers passed me before I reach Lower Paradise, and I gave them each a heads up about my earlier bear sighting. Upon reaching Lower Paradise there were two folks who had ignored the closure notice and camped there. I let them know as well. 

The miles slipped by much easier, the pack a little lighter, the temperatures pleasant and mostly going downhill. I stopped at Mist Falls, and this time the entire area was empty. I sat a listened to the roar of the river tumbling down. When I went to put my pack back on, the sternum strap snapped. Crud! Maybe this was a sign that turning back was a good idea. Also, I did discover a hole in one of my pairs of Darn Tough Socks…. About ¾ of a mile past Mist Falls, I meet my first day-hikers. A family was taking a break and politely asked if I had bug spray. The bugs had been worse today. In fact, at Mist Falls, I broke out the bug net. I turned around and told the father which pocket to find it in. They were so happy. We chatted some before we each headed our separate ways. 

As I made my way along the trail, a mule train was making its way up, I assume to resupply the ranger station at Rae Lakes. I stepped aside and let them pass. Now I would watch out for fresh droppings on the trail. A bit further down, I met two more day-hikers, they told me they just encountered a rattlesnake slithering off the trail. Sure, enough it was just off to the side, minding its own business. I safely snapped a photo or two and continued on. 

I started to encounter a mix of day-hikers and those still heading out to attempt the loop. I let the backpackers know about my bear sighting at Middle Paradise and wished them well. Soon, I found myself back at the junction of Bubbs Creek and the Kings River. I hoped to cross that bridge upon my return from the loop. But this time just a quick stroll on it would have to do.

The day was getting much warmer, and I could feel the need to drink more and more as I covered the last couple of miles. I found myself drifting from shady section to shady section again. I was guessing it was in the mid to upper 80s. I would know soon enough once I got to the car. It was about 10:30, and I met someone just heading out. We chatted a bit, he had just landed a walk-up permit. He had hoped to have the ability to send a message to his wife, but couldn’t. So I offered to pass along his itinerary for him once I was able to.

Finally, the permit station came into view. I spoke with the ranger and gave him my bear sighting information, as well as the camping at Lower Paradise and the fire issue. The area is now at Stage 3 fire restrictions, so the small fire I had is no longer allowed.  Once at the car, I cleaned up some, then threw on some shorts and a t-shirt. Unfortunately, I also developed a nice blister on my toe. I had felt something earlier, but when I checked my foot, I did not see it. I guess it was another sign that I made the right call. I picked out some snacks for the ride home, but the trail mix was not going to be one of the options, as it had melted into a mass of goo. Yeah, it had been warm on this hike. As I pulled away, heading toward Cedar Grove for some cold soda and a snack, I waited for the car’s thermometer to settle down. It read 95°F at 11 am. Yikes! That would explain why I had so much trouble, it was even hotter than I planned. 

As I drove up out of Kings Canyon, I pulled over at a nice vista and could see the start of the clouds forming in the distance. I decided to take the long way home and drive through Sequoia National Park. I did not plan to stop, I just wanted to enjoy the trees and views. Once back off the mountain, I headed back through Bakersfield, this time stopping at Dewar’s to pick up some chews for the family. All in all, it was an adventure to build on. Except for the one-two punch of the heat and the predicted rain, the trip went mostly well. Maybe in the early fall, I might find an opportunity to try again…

The forecast on Monday.

Mount Inspiration

After grabbing lunch, it was time to enter the park proper to summit my third peak of the day, Mount Inspiration. As I sat in the slow-moving line of cars to enter, I enjoyed my burrito. Once in the park, I drove on toward Keys View. Along the way, I passed full parking lots and tons of people enjoying the park. I hoped I would be able to find a spot in the parking lot once I got there. One advantage of this destination is most do not stay that long, so I should not have to wait long for a spot to open. Thankfully, just as I pulled up, a spot opened and I grabbed it. I had tried to do the peak a couple of times before but was never able to work out the logistics. 

The trail begins at the northwest corner of the parking lot. I could see a few folks atop the first section of the trail enjoying the views. I worked my way up the trail with no trouble. Once I was at the top I could see the use trail continuing off to the northwest. It dropped down to a small saddle before working its way up toward South Mount Inspiration. Here I met two hikers returning from the summit. They were also working on the Sierra Club Hundred Peaks Section (HPS) list. One of them had about 70 done! We chatted a bit before parting ways, and I noted a section they mentioned gave them trouble.

The use trail continued to be really good until it reached a small bump en route. I scanned the terrain and spotted it working its way around it to the east. This is where I think those two hikers had the trouble they mentioned. Also along the way, I passed a metal shed. I have no clue as to what it is — some more research is going to be needed.

Once on the summit, I found the primary mark, and reference mark #2. Try as I might, reference mark #1 could not be located. I also found the register tucked under a small rock pile. The label box made for a nice photo. The skies had become hazy, so those snow-capped mountains from earlier in the day were not nearly as visible.

On my way back, I made the small detour to the top of South Mount Inspiration just because. Soon, the parking lot came back into view, and shortly thereafter I was back at my car. With that, three more HPS peaks were now complete. Next week, I will attempt my 98th peak on the San Diego Sierra Club 100 Peak list.

Eureka Peak

Had I not wanted to have a low-key day, I might have connected my trip up Warren Peak to Eureka Peak, but I was not interested in that kind of mileage. Instead, I drove down Covington Flat road toward Warren Peak. This was a nicely groomed dirt road, better than some roads I have driven in San Diego. I had the window down and enjoyed the 25-minute drive.

I parked at the end of the road, with one other car parked nearby. Since the peak was only about 1/10th of the mile from the parking area, I just grabbed my wind shell and trekking poles.

The actual peak is almost barren, sans one lone plant. I could not find any marks nor a register but was not surprised. The views were lovely, but the wind made it chilly, so once again I did not linger. As I drove back toward town to grab lunch, several cars passed me. While some were off-road friendly, I hoped the Honda Civic and Tesla did not encounter any issues.

Warren Peak

After the intense effort of last weekend’s peaks, I wanted to spend some time taking it a bit easier. While I did have some friends planning to hike Mile High via Rattlesnake Canyon, a route that looks very interesting, that was going to be a bit more than I wanted. So, instead, I opted to head out to Joshua Tree and try to knock off some of the peaks on the Sierra Club Hundred Peaks Section (HPS) list. Since it is high desert season, I knew I needed to get to the trailhead early for my first peak, Warren Point. The trail begins from the Black Rock Campground, & I got one of the last spots at the trailhead parking area when I arrived at 7:30. I grabbed my gear and set off through the campground. 

The trail was very well marked and clearly well-traveled by the number of footprints in the dirt. After a short bit, the West Side Loop Trail connected with the Black Rock Canyon Trail and continued south. This trail eventually reached the Panorama Loop. As tempting as it was to add this onto the adventure, I was hoping to cross three peaks off the list today, so I took the fork leading up to Warren Peak.

The trail would start to turn westward as it made its way up toward the peak. The peak finally revealed itself near the junction to the spur out to Warren View. The path now became a bit steeper, and I met two hikers returning from the summit. As I approached the summit, the winds had picked up a bit, so I tossed on my wind shell before reaching the top. The trail had curved behind the peak, so the scrambling I thought I might have to do never materialized.

I found the primary mark and the register. This is a fairly popular peak, given its closeness to the campground, so the register was at best a year old. The views of San Jacinto and San Gorgonio were spectacular from the summit. I did not linger too long, as the wind was a touch chilly and I had two more peaks to visit.

On my return, I passed quite a few groups of hikers making their way up the trail. For the most part, the trail is nice and wide, so I had no concerns. I opted to stay on the Black Rock Canyon trail the entire way back to the car. When I got to the car, every parkable area was taken. I was able to carefully back out and head to my next destination, Eureka Peak.

Mastodon Peak

I pulled into Cottonwood Springs Campground around 3 pm. Since this part of Joshua Tree National Park is lower in elevation, it was a bit warmer. I set up my tent and relaxed in my chair beneath some shade. I rehydrated some more while enjoying Journeys North: The Pacific Crest Trail by Barney “Scout” Mann. As the sun began to get lower, I thought about summiting Mastodon Peak then, instead of in the morning. Since the trailhead right at the campground, so I grabbed my gear, making sure to toss in my headlamp and set off.

Opting to take the loop in a counter-clockwise route, I soon found myself at Cottonwood Springs. The evening light was making the palm fronds glow. I continued up the trail, watching as the evening light crept across the desert. Soon I reached the turnoff toward Mastodon Peak and Mine. The Lost Palm Oasis would have to wait for another time…

The trail continued working its way up. There were even some nice carved steps at one point along the trail. Finally, Mastodon Peak revealed itself. A sign indicated that the summit was just .1 miles away but on an unmaintained trail. I knew from my research that the path circled around to the eastern side of the peak and had some light scrambling. I found the route without issue, and with two little scrambles was standing atop Mastodon Peak. The sun had almost set, so I was being mindful of the time. Even so, I got some nice photographs.

After scrambling back down, I rejoined the trail and soon found myself at the Mastodon Mine. The actual mine shaft is grated over and is now home to a variety of bats. I looked over some of the other artifacts for a bit before continuing on.

The trail was still fairly easy to follow as the light faded. Finally, I stopped and donned my headlamp. When I was on a rise, I could see the lights of the campground off in the distance. Once in a while, I would see a bat fly by, much too fast to even attempt to snap a photo.

Soon, I found myself back at the junction to the trail and my thoughts were turning toward dinner. All told this hike was 3.36 miles with just over 500 feet of elevation gain. It took me 1:35 to complete it (including a short side spur). 

Ryan Mountain

My second peak of the day was to be Ryan Mountain, which is also on the Sierra Club Hundred Peaks Section list (#239). This peak is one of the more popular hikes in the park, in part due to the incredible views from the summit. Before I set off, I saw a couple looking over a map, and I offered some assistance as to their next adventure. Afterward, I chatted with one of the volunteers nearby. We commented on how many of the hikers were improperly clothed for the hike. Shorts, t-shirts, or tank-tops were common on many of them. While we stood there in long pants and long-sleeves and wide-brimmed hats just shaking our heads. 

The trail begins climbing straight from the parking lot. For the first part of the trail, stairs built from the native rocks helped me make the 1,000-foot climb to the summit. Standing off to the right, just after hitting the trail, was a massive rock formation. This white tank granite is over 135 million years old.

I would keep climbing up the mountain, letting the returning hikers pass safely by. It was hit and miss on the face-covering usage. After a short, relatively level section, the rock stairs returned until I reached the saddle. Here I got my first real view of the summit. At this point, the trail’s grade eased and I soon found myself atop Ryan Mountain. 

I had packed my lunch, so I found a nice spot to rest and enjoy my well-earned meal. The views were truly spectacular. The summit is nice and wide, so everyone was able to find a spot to safely distance from one another.

While it was warmer, the breeze made it pleasant to just soak in the views. I eventually figured I should head back down, as I had about an hour’s drive down to my campsite at Cottonwood Springs. The descent was uneventful, except for the sweeping views. All told, I covered the 2.8 miles in 1:43 with 1,060 feet of gain. 

Lost Horse Mine

I decided to spend a couple of days exploring Joshua Tree National Park. The first day was spent summiting some peaks, and the second day would be playing tour guide for a friend. Since the weather was still warm, I knew I wanted to get an early start. I arrived at the trailhead for Lost Horse Mine to an empty parking lot around 7:30 am. This was to be the longest hike of the day, so I wanted to get it done first. After grabbing my gear, I set off to see the well-preserved mine and then summit the nearby peak. The entire loop is just about 7 miles, while if you just go to the mine and back it is about 4.5 miles. Being mindful of the temperatures, I was unsure which option I was going to take. As I stepped onto the trail, I saw the sign that the park had turned this trail into a one-way route, so I realized I’d doing the loop.

The trail worked its way back into the wilderness. About a mile in, a runner shouted that he was coming up from behind. I didn’t expect to see that on the trail. I wished him a safe run and he wished me an enjoyable hike. As I made my way toward the mine, I was rewarded with some nice vistas of the park. Soon the mine came into view. I had tried several times in the past to hike out to this site but had been unable to. 

I took the spur trail up to the Lost Horse Mine. The mine itself is fenced off, so it took a little finagling to take my photos. It is quite a sight to see. After exploring some of the surrounding artifacts, I rejoined the main trail and headed along my clockwise route. I soon came to the turnoff to make the ascent to Lost Horse Mountain. This peak is #251 on the Sierra Club Hundred Peaks Section, hence why I was eager to climb it.

The route is straight up the short slope, and I was able to follow the faint use trail for most of it. As expected I was rewarded with some sweeping views. A light breeze made it quite nice. There was no register nor benchmark to be found. After a short break, I headed back down, knowing I had another 4 or so miles of hiking to return to the car. 

Once I was back on the trail, it began its steep descent for a while. I stopped for a bit to explore what appeared to be closed mine shafts. Here, an actual hiker passed me. We exchanged hellos as he continued on. Since I was hoping for a multiple peak day, I was playing it conservatively with my pace and energy. 

After a bit, I came to the ruins of an abandoned cabin that Johnny Lang, the founder of the mine, moved to after being accused of stealing gold from the mine. All that remains is the chimney and the bed frame. This is also the site of the Optimist Mine, which unlike the Lost Horse Mine, was a bust.

Once I made a short climb, the trail would gradually descend back to the car. I was passed by another runner. Did I miss the notice for the race? Around a mile to go, I encountered three hikers going the other direction. I let them know that this trail is one-way and they might encounter some folks giving them the stink-eye.

While I cruised along, I debated what my second peak will be. Mount Inspiration was an option. While short, it was a use-trail-only hike. My other option was Ryan Mountain, which would have more traffic. In the end, I decided Ryan Mountain would be the smart choice. Soon the road came into view as well as the parking lot. The lot had filled up since I set off. Tossing my gear into the back and enjoying some cold water, I was off for the short drive to the next peak. This hike took me 3 hours to cover the 7 miles with 1,111 feet of gain.

Half Dome

One of the items on my bucket list was to summit Yosemite’s Half Dome. This year I got a permit for the cables in late September! I convinced Ted Markus to join me on the adventure. However, as most know, I herniated two discs in my neck in early April. Slowly, I began my recovery from the injury. I kept focusing on getting strong enough to attempt the Dome. As the time got closer, I felt that I might be able to do it. My foot was doing well through the training hikes, and my neck was better. So, on Friday (Sept 21st), we loaded up the car and headed to Yosemite. Since it is a drive and sadly, we are not in our 20s, we decided to break the drive up into two parts. Since we were passing through Bakersfield, I had to introduce Ted to the only two good things in that town; Basque food (Benji’s) and Dewars!

After a fine meal and some ice cream, and some chews to bring home, we headed on to Visalia for the night. As we drove into the Yosemite the next morning, the effects of the Ferguson fire were all around us; trees still smoldering, “Thank You” signs hung on fences, and repair crews still working to restore services…

We drove our way up to Glacier Point to gaze at the Dome, as well as much of the route we would take the next morning from the valley floor: first past Vernal Falls, then Nevada Falls, along the Little Yosemite Valley, then back around to the sub-dome, then the cables to the top.

We had talked about a short hike to Sentinel Dome, but it took us 20 minutes to park at Glacier Point, and the parking at the Trailhead was full. In fact, some poor driver got his car seriously stuck as we were leaving.

We returned back to the valley floor to see some sights, find our trailhead, and double-check our permits with the Rangers. We took a short hike out to Mirror Lake (long since dry for the season) and to gaze up at the sheer face of Half Dome.

As the sun began to set, we headed out of the valley for an early dinner and last-minute prep for the following day. On the way out, we were greeted with some magical light against the valley walls.

Unfortunately, the room we had reserved in El Portal had a pipe burst, so we had to stay another 10 minutes further from the entrance. We quickly settled in and had a forgettable dinner and hit the pillows. The alarm was set for 3:00 am, but we were both up before then. The air was crisp but not cool as we drove back into the park. The parking lot was slowly filling up with other hikers. We donned our gear and headed off. After a quarter-mile, we realized we made the wrong turn, so backtracking, we found the road to the Happy Isles bridge and began in earnest.

Through the darkness, lit only by our lamps, we trekked along the asphalt path toward the Vernal Falls bridge. A critter moved along the side of the trail, and the white stripe along its back made us pause and retreat. Thankfully, the only stink that we would be carrying would be our own.

The splashing of the unseen Merced River could be heard as we climbed ever upward. Once we left the paved trail, the real hike began. About a mile later, I took a misstep and rolled my right ankle. I could not believe it! It hurt some, but I could put weight on it. Hoping it was just a light sprain, I soldiered on in the darkness, taking a tad more care as I climbed the stone steps every upward.

Dawn’s light slowly began to fill the canyon, revealing the beauty that had been hidden. Atop the falls, we took a break before climbing to entering Little Yosemite Falls. We missed a turn and followed the wrong path for a bit. Our ‘Spidey-Sense’ told us to backtrack. Ted’s GPS was bouncing all over the place in the narrow canyon. So we entered the relative flat of Little Yosemite and enjoyed the respite as the Merced River flowed past…

The ankle was gently reminding me of the episode hours earlier as we walked through some river sand. I could also feel the elevation in my lungs as we climbed ever higher.

Soon, we began to catch glimpses of the backside of Half Dome and the sub-dome. They still were towering above us, although we had been hiking since 4:30 and it was close to 9:00 am. When we reached the turnoff for the last two miles up to Half Dome, we unloaded my two side water bottles, and Ted’s Gatorade, behind a tree. No sense in carrying the weight up to the summit.

I could feel my energy begin to drain, along with the unsteadiness of my ankle. I told myself that at the sub-dome I would be honest and decide if I should abandon the attempt. Over 7,000 feet up, the lungs were feeling it. We had started the day at about 4,000 feet.

Closer and closer, we neared the sub-dome, which many had said was equally as hard as the cable ascent.

As I reached the base of the sub-dome, I knew that I did not have it in me to safely attempt the summit. Between the ankle and my energy, I knew that I should not try. I was truly saddened as I wished Ted good luck on his summit attempt. I placed my safety belt on a rock, where I hoped someone would be able to use it. Ted said he passed his along as well once he was done with it.

We agreed to rendezvous back where we left the water. As I descended, my ankle gently reminded me that I was making the correct choice. I found solace under the pines as I worked my way back down. Once at the junction, I let my feet rest, ate some of my lunch and sipped some water. I chatted with hikers as they passed, wishing them good luck on their attempts. Then I began to worry about my pace and the distance I needed to cover to return to the trailhead.

I packed up my water and left Ted’s empty Gatorade as a signal that I had started back down (along with an arrow made of sticks). As I made my way back down the switchbacks, each step reinforced my decision. I knew that Ted would catch me at some point, and if not, I planned to wait at the bridge at Nevada Falls, where we would take the John Muir Trail (JMT) down, bypassing the steep, stone steps from earlier.

Just before entering Little Yosemite Valley, the Ranger was checking permits on her iPad. I gave her my name and asked her to pass along a message to Ted that I was ok and headed down. I was also able to find some ankle tape, which greatly helped. I was so lucky that it was just lying there…

Ted caught me just before we left the valley again. Crossing over the Merced River, we were treated to some tremendous views of the falls as we worked our way down the JMT.

We still had about 4+ more miles to go back down to the valley floor, along with about 2,000 feet of elevation. Although this route is longer, by about 2 miles, our knees and my ankle were thankful.

We did have a brief unscheduled stop, because a bear and her two cubs were reported ahead, so we let them pass. We did not see them.

But our adventure was not over! We decided to take the long way home down the 395 the next day. If you have never explored this road, you must. It is truly a hidden gem of California. After one last farewell to Half Dome, we continued along the 120, and over the pass at 10,000+ feet.

We quickly began our descent toward Lee Vinning, but not before more awesome vistas filled our car window. Our first quick stop along the 395 was at Mono Lake and the Tufas. (It was too early to hit the Whoa Nellie Deli).

As we drove down the 395, the eastern Sierras rose sharply along the highway. Patches of snow still clinging to a few spots. As lunchtime approached, we were nearing the town of Bishop, which could only mean one thing…

Grabbing some sandwiches to go, and a bag of bread for the family, we continued back toward San Diego. As we neared Lone Pine, we stopped at the Manzanar National Historic Site.

In 1942, the United States government ordered more than 110,000 men, women, and children to leave their homes and detained them in remote, military-style camps. Manzanar War Relocation Center was one of ten camps where Japanese American citizens and resident Japanese aliens were incarcerated during World War II. Sobering…

After a brief look at the Visitor Center and the driving tour of the site, we headed the short way to Lone Pine on Whitney Portal Road. There we headed out to the Alabama Hills and the Mobius Arch.

I was too sore to attempt the hike to the arch. I had seen it a few years before, so Ted scampered down the trail. I did stare up at Mt. Whitney in the distance…

We made our way through the high desert, occasionally slowed by traffic. It looks like the 395 is being widened from Kramer Junction to the 15 (eventually), and the 58 will be bypassing Kramer Junction sometime soon as well. We both reflected on the journey and we were thankful for it and the support of our family to undertake it.

Soon, the sun was setting over the desert, and Chris and Ted’s adventure came to a close. Thanks for reading. Happy Trails…